Coloring, Shading, and Effects in Photoshop-part 2

Step 5: Highlights

Picture of Highlights
Picture of Highlights
Picture of Highlights

For highlights, I use a softer brush and a more general light. I select the color layer because I use the softer brush on the edges of the artwork, and the selection helps to prevent color from leaving the artwork and spilling onto the background, which could be problematic if you decide to color the background. As with Multiply, Overlay does a nice job of preserving the colors underneath, and saves you time from switching to different tones. If Overlay doesn’t suit your tastes, feel free to mess around with other Layer Blending Modes and their opacities.

***Ignore my counting system, the Instructables Steps and the steps inside the images may differ, as I’m also uploading these instructions to another site.

Step 6: Effects

Picture of Effects
Picture of Effects

Effects are where your imagination can go wild! Color Dodge is an interesting Blending Mode, and I’d recommend messing around with other colors besides Warm Yellow, and other Blending Modes and their opacities!

Keep that selection up from the previous step to ensure your effects aren’t going outside the artwork.

***Ignore my counting system, the Instructables Steps and the steps inside the images may differ, as I’m also uploading these instructions to another site.

Step 7: Getting Rid of White Space

Picture of Getting Rid of White Space
Picture of Getting Rid of White Space
Picture of Getting Rid of White Space

If you’d like to put a background on your artwork (or add a shadow, like we’ll do in the next step), getting rid of the blank white space around your artwork from the scanning process is crucial. Expand Selection is an easy way to grab any extra white pixels that the selection missed (common problem in low resolution scans), but it may take some of your linework from the Scan Layer. That’s why I used such a small amount of expand, but mess around with how much you need. Especially with pencil, sometimes white spots stay no matter how much expanding you do, and in that case you’ll have to manually go in and erase and re-line as needed.

***Ignore my counting system, the Instructables Steps and the steps inside the images may differ, as I’m also uploading these instructions to another site.

Step 8: Simple Shadow

Picture of Simple Shadow

A shadow can ground a creature or character, and doesn’t even have to be that complicated. I just use a simple, dark gray circle, but feel free to mess around with shapes, opacity, Layer Styles (double click on the layer), and other neat tricks.

***Ignore my counting system, the Instructables Steps and the steps inside the images may differ, as I’m also uploading these instructions to another site.

Step 9: Finished (?)

Picture of Finished (?)

This is where I usually finish my own quick pieces, but nothing solidifies a method like practice! And nothing beats messing around with all the tools in Photoshop. Go back to any of the previous steps and use a different Blending Mode, a different brush, or add a bunch of color layers. Double-click on layers to open up Layer Styles, and mess around with all of those too!

I hope you found this short tutorial helpful, now go out there and color the world!!!

***Ignore my counting system, the Instructables Steps and the steps inside the images may differ, as I’m also uploading these instructions to another site.